Chimpanzee protection

One of the ways the Jane Goodall Institute protects wild chimpanzees and other primates is through the Tchimpounga sanctuary and by supporting law enforcement efforts to reduce illegal trafficking.

JGI also raises awareness about the importance of protecting endangered species. Without sanctuaries, law enforcement officers who confiscate chimpanzees from great ape traffickers or hunters would have no place to take them.

Raising awareness is critically important as well. Local communities have become increasingly aware that they should alert law enforcement agencies about poachers and that hunting great apes is illegal. We are now seeing an increase in arrests and prosecutions as a result of greater application of the law. Even so, we must continue to work towards better protection of chimpanzees.

Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center

The Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center is the largest chimpanzee sanctuary in Africa. This natural wildlife refuge is home to more than 150 rescued chimps, all victims of illegal trade or poaching.

Snare removal

The Jane Goodall Institute has a team consisting of trained Ugandan trackers for the Snare removal programme. The task of this snare removal team is to locate and remove the snares, and to mark on maps via GPS systems areas where poachers are active.

Public Awareness

Public awareness, school-based programming and community outreach all play a part in our work in the field and at the Tchimpounga sanctuary. It is important that local communities are aware of the decreasing populations of chimpanzees.

Gombe Stream Research Center

Dr. Jane founded the Gombe Stream Research Centre in 1965 and since then it has evolved into a living laboratory, home to the world’s most studied group of wild chimpanzees.

Photo credits: (banner and 1st photo) Fernando Turmo/JGI Congo , (2nd and 3rd photo) Sophie Muset/JGI Canada , (last photo) National Geographic